Advancing Women in the Workplace

There remain many miles to travel before gender equality is truly achieved in the workplace. While this current inequality can, in part, be addressed with public policy initiatives, there are things that women can do to improve their individual career prospects and help other women in the workplace succeed.

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    Advancing Women in the Workplace

    Advancing Women in the Workplace

    Women have made exceptional progress at work, but there remain many miles to travel before gender equality is truly achieved in the workplace. While this current inequality can, in part, be addressed with public policy initiatives, there are a number of things that women can do to improve their individual career prospects and help other women in the workplace succeed.

    Advancing in the Workplace

    Achieving professional success comes from a mix of self-advocacy and developing a network of professionals that can provide practical and moral support throughout the career journey. Success begins with:

    1. Knowing what you want from a career and an employer—Without a destination in mind, progress becomes a matter of chance rather than design. Evaluate what you want from a career. Is your objective ascending the management ladder or achieving a certain professional or technical level?
    1. Being fully prepared—When it comes time to speak with your manager or another part of the organization about rising to a more responsible role, be prepared for that conversation. What are your accomplishments? How do these accomplishments and your experience apply to the prospective new role? How familiar are you with the role and the needs of the organization?
    1. Knowing your worth—Everyone (males included) think they are worth more than what they’re paid. When asking for a raise or negotiating compensation for a new job, do some market research on industry pay for that role and for someone with your experience. Facts will give you confidence that the salary you seek doesn’t undervalue you nor price you outside what employers are willing to pay.
    1. Developing allies and finding a mentor—Allies and mentors (men especially) inside and outside of your employer can be very valuable throughout the progression of your career. Not only are they teachers, but they can become your advocates to help you land career opportunities that might not have otherwise been available to you.

    Advocate for Others

    Whatever your career stage, there are many actions you can take to support other women’s career growth, including:

    • Becoming a mentor to others
    • Making referrals for open positions
    • Not overlooking inappropriate behaviors
    • Listening to what goes on in the workplace and to other women
    • Championing female peers
    • Promoting training and events
    • Providing positive feedback to women

    Let it not go unsaid, but the career ceiling women experience can, in many cases, be tied to men’s attitudes, some of which may be of the unconscious kind. Accordingly, women need to enlighten the men in their lives to the male mindsets that hold women back in order to effect fundamental and long-lasting change.

    Please reference disclosures: https://blog.americanportfolios.com/disclosures/

    About The Author

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    Vice President of Human Resources 
    631.439.4600, ext. 280 

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